How a Realist Hero Rebuilt the Kingdom: First Impression

Title: How a Realist Hero Rebuilt the Kingdom
Genre: Isekai
Where: Funimation
Synopsis: When Kazuya Souma is unexpectedly transported to another world, he knows the people expect a hero. But Souma’s idea of heroism is more practical than most—he wants to rebuild the flagging economy of the new land he’s found himself in! Betrothed to the princess and abruptly planted on the throne, this realist hero must gather talented people to help him get the country back on its feet—not through war, or adventure, but with administrative reform! (CREDIT: https://myanimelist.net/anime/41710/Genjitsu_Shugi_Yuusha_no_Oukoku_Saikenki)

If you love isekai, give this one a shot. I really, really enjoyed the first two episodes.

**POTENTIAL SPOILERS. PROCEED WITH CAUTION**

This isekai is self-aware. Our protagonist, Souma, is summoned by another world, so he has full recollection of his past life, not that his past life had anything to leave behind. He was alone in the world after the passing of his last relative. When Souma arrives to the new world, he is annoyed, but gives the king a chance to explain why he was summoned. It is explained that the empire is in a deadlocked battle with a nation of demons and that nations not on the border need to provide financial assistance to the empire. The king appears to lack a backbone and is not very regal at all. In fact, when Souma inquires exactly what his duty at the hero entails, the king doesn’t even have the courage to explain it to Souma. Instead, the king motions to their prime minister, Marx, to take the honors. It is explained that in the instance their nation cannot provide financial aid to the empire, they are to summon the hero. And, what, pray tell, do they intend to do with Souma? Why, use the hero for payment, of course! Deducing that he is the only card the nation has to play, Souma has to quickly think on his feet. It doesn’t seem like being traded off for payment will guarantee his safety, or the protection of his life. He doesn’t want to be traded off for payment, so he quickly convinces the king that handing over their only card to play would not be an intelligent move.

Temporarily securing his safety, they have a meeting lasting three days and three nights. The next day, the king introduces Souma and then, by ambush, quickly abdicates his throne and declares Souma king. In addition, he announces the engagement of Souma to his daughter. Standing behind the king, we see the queen with a big smile. It seems to hint that maybe, this was the queen’s idea.

So far, the show is actually refreshing. Instead of an overpowered hero, we have a hero that is blessed with magic that is neither powerful of elegant. He is given the power to split his consciousness which happens to be effective in bureaucratic paperwork. Instead of a hero fighting the nation’s problems on a battlefield, he is going to reform the country to be more self-sufficient. The nation is starving and poor. Using his knowledge from his world, Souma begins to recruit the nation’s best talent to get it back on its feet.

As for the love story, the princess and Souma get along well. I can tell that their love story will progress slowly which is a breath of fresh air. I like love stories that progress with time. It appears that by working together to save the nation, they will fall in love.

There are plenty of comic relief moments, but also, a very realistic approach to saving a nation. So far, I really like the first two episodes and see myself following this one to the end.

Author: The Filthy Casual

I live my life one casual hobby at a time.

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